Don’t Let Sleep Deprivation Lead to Unhealthy Choices at Work

Don’t Let Sleep Deprivation Lead to Unhealthy Choices at Work

Posts by Abby Quillen By
November 27, 2017

Crave junk food at your job? Blame late-night Netflix binges or whatever else keeps you up at night. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates as many as one-third of Americans don’t get enough sleep. Exhaustion is not only a productivity killer: Research suggests it’s also disastrous for your diet.

Pushing the snooze button too many times makes it tough to prepare a healthy breakfast at home in the morning. To make it worse, fatigue may make us hungrier, desire more calorie-dense comfort food, and lack the willpower to pass up treats. Keep reading to learn how sleep deprivation impacts your food choices. Then find tips to get enough restorative sleep (which may make it easier to reach for kale chips instead of a candy bar).

Your Brain and Body on Fatigue

It’s not your imagination: You eat more when you’re tired. In one study, people who were deprived of sleep for eight nights ate an average of 549 more calories per day than usual.

Why does being tired give people the munchies? The reason may be similar to why marijuana causes the munchies. In a study, people who were allowed only four and a half hours of sleep per night for four nights had higher blood levels of endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), a chemical signal that acts on the cannabinoid receptors in the brain. 2-AG, which makes eating more pleasurable, is typically low during the night, peaks in the afternoon, and decreases throughout the evening. However, in sleep-deprived subjects, 2-AG levels remained elevated throughout the afternoon and evening. The study participants ate 50% more calories, and double the fat, when they were sleep-deprived, than when they were well rested.

Being tired seems to make people, especially susceptible to eating highly palatable snacks, such as cookies, candy, and chips. Why? Your nose may be the culprit. Sleep deprivation increases the brain’s sensitivity to food smells. Participants in one study were allowed to sleep only four hours and then exposed to various smells while hooked up to an fMRI machine (which measures and maps brain activity). Later the participants repeated the exercise after a full night of sleep. When sleep deprived subjects were exposed to food odors, their brains showed more activity in two brain areas linked to sense of smell. (That could explain why cinnamon rolls are irresistible after a late night.)

You don’t only eat more after poor sleep. You also burn fewer calories, perhaps because the body is trying to compensate for the energy you expended the night before when you’d normally be sleeping. A few nights of rotten sleep can compel people to eat more than 500 extra calories per day and burn an average of 96 fewer calories per day than normal. It makes sense that continued sleep disturbances are linked to obesity.

Sleep Well to Eat Well

The Science of Sleeping Well

Here’s the good news: You can improve your sleep, and you don’t need to rely on sleep aids or supplements, which can be habit-forming and have potential risks. Most of us already know it’s a good idea to skip an afternoon latte and go easy on the cocktails for restful sleep. You may also up your odds of catching enough Zs by adopting these healthy habits:

Conclusion

By adopting healthy habits, you can improve your chances of getting restorative sleep. And remember: Despite your best efforts, sleepless nights may occasionally happen. They don’t need to derail your healthy diet though. Research shows proximity makes a difference when it comes to food choices. If you’re fortunate enough to work in an office that offers complementary food, ask your employer to stock healthy options. Eating well makes a big difference to your health and productivity, and it’s easier when healthy food is available and you’ve had a restful night of sleep.

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